Petri Color 35
       
     
FED 5C
       
     
Kodak Bantam
       
     
Mamiyaflex C2
       
     
Kodak Bullet Camera
       
     
Agfa Synchro Box
       
     
Contaflex I
       
     
Yashica 44 LM
       
     
Petri Color 35
       
     
Petri Color 35

The Petri Color 35 was the first manual film camera I ever played with and was originally my Great Uncle Frank's, as was the pictured Tiltall tripod. That's his milk bottle replacement lens cap on the Petri. The Tiltall which he likely purchased new in the 1970s serves as my main studio tripod. 

FED 5C
       
     
FED 5C

FED 5C rangefinder, produced in the USSR somewhere 1977-96, though the construction and controls look more like something out of the 1950’s.

Kodak Bantam
       
     
Kodak Bantam

Kodak Bantam pocket camera manufactured between 1938 and 1947. 

Mamiyaflex C2
       
     
Mamiyaflex C2

Mamiyaflex C2 TLR built in 1958. I am falling in love with this camera for studio portraiture and all of its quirks that force you to slow down and compose.

Kodak Bullet Camera
       
     
Kodak Bullet Camera

Kodak Bullet Camera, manufactured between 1936 and 1942. Great example of art deco design with a pop up viewfinder and screw out lens for pocket portability. A precursor to the bellows-style Kodak Bantam.

Agfa Synchro Box
       
     
Agfa Synchro Box

Agfa Synchro Box. Made between 1949-58 in Munich, Germany, this was a simple 120 rollfilm box camera for the masses with a fixed focus, fixed shutter speed, two apertures, and a pair of simple waist level finders that at least give an idea of where you are pointing the lens. The synchro means it has those two nubs on the top for flash sync.

Contaflex I
       
     
Contaflex I

The Contaflex I was introduced in 1953, and is Zeiss Ikon's first compact SLR featuring a leaf shutter and fixed 45mm, 2.8 lens. 

Yashica 44 LM
       
     
Yashica 44 LM

This late ‘50s or early ‘60s Yashica 44LM is a relatively compact TLR with a selenium lightmeter that miraculously still works all these years later. The 127 roll film format is practically obsolete but still available from Rerapan.